64 hack

64 hack

I’ve always had a small fascination with hybrid clothes. Culottes are a particular obsession. I know, I know – they’re very fashion right now, but sometimes I just want to scream at them: are you a skirt? Are you a pant? DECLARE yourselves!

Other favourites are jeggings, which seem to have had their hilarious time in the sun; and skorts – they’re huge right now at our local primary school. I secretly dream of one day patenting my very own hybrid garment, the Ugg Suit (trademark). If the name doesn’t give it away, it’s a sheepskin jumpsuit/ugg boot all-in-one. I plan to climb into this garment in mid-Autumn, and stay in it until early Spring.

 

64 Hack

 

Until the prototype is perfected, this woollen top is a dabble in hybrid invention for the colder months. My idea started as a jacket, which morphed with a t-shirt. I had to alter a pattern as I hadn’t found one that matched my vision, so my first choice for a pattern hack was the Merchant and Mills Top no. 64. I’ve made the 64 many times and I’m a fan. M&M patterns are well explained, easy to follow and the packaging is so very pleasing.

64hack04

 

The hack jacket (hacket?) in my mind had elbow length sleeves that were bell shaped. I also wanted the back to sway out with a slightly lower hem at the back. The 64 already has lovely raglan sleeves that I kept, but I deleted the pocket detail because my fabric is a coat wool with considerable bulk. It’s a vintage wool I bought a while ago from Crossley Job Lot. Crossley itself is a story worth telling, but for now it’s is about the damage done to a poor Top No. 64!

 

64 Hack

64 Hack

64 Hack

 

To make my sleeve and back flare I had to do some learning. A friend with qualified sewing credentials recommended Winifred Aldrich’s book, Metric Pattern Cutting for Women’s Wear. I bought a copy on eBay that has signs of use and love, and I think it’s really helpful. The diagrams are simple and I find it easy enough to understand the pattern speak to help nut out how to alter a pattern. As you can see from Winifred’s diagram (pictured) I cut the sleeve pattern piece as suggested, fanned out the pieces and redrafted a new sleeve. The back was created in a similar way. Fortunately it worked. I’ve done hacks in the past working on logic alone and failed miserably. What I love most about Winifred is that she’s concise and logical with her explanations.

 

64 Hack

 

On the downside I think my neckline needs a little work as it sits up a bit, but I’m not sure if the fabric weight causes that? I think I need to alter my pattern – one day when I’m skilled enough to solve that one. Still, I’m wearing this top quite a bit as it’s comfortable, warm and a nice change from my regular winter coat. It will do until the Ugg Suit’s ready.

 

 

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2 comments

  • this happens to me when the upper back of the garment needs additional fabric to cover any roundness on my upper body. it pulls the front backward to compensate. since it’s already completed you might want to try taking small darts at the back neck to close the gap and create some shape against your body that way. however you’ve made this before without incident, so who knows, right? have you considered a small chain along the front hem for weight that would pull the front forward? if these or a combination of these don’t work, the only other thing that occurs to me is sending it to me. please email for my home address. 😉

  • I love your hack and beg you to you share your pattern as I would like to be your twin in fashion. It looks fabulous as a garment and on you. Great work!